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The new Introduction to Emergency Communications course includes updated content from the previous Basic Emergency Communications Level 1 course, as well as some content previously included in the former Level 2 course. The EmComm training program has been restructured to offer two courses: This enhanced basic course for EmComm volunteers who want to serve as part of an ARES® response team and the management course -- Public Service and Emergency Communication Management for Radio Amateurs (EC-016, also available on the ARRL website) -- for those who are serving in ARES® leadership and management roles.

Click Here for Complete Details...

To learn more, visit the CCE Course Listing page or contact the Continuing Education Program Coordinator.

Check out our Training Page for Additional Information on Training Opportunities !


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Amateur Radio 
Supporting Homeland Security

"Amateur Radio - The only fail-safe method of communication."

Riley Hollingsworth
FCC Special Council


"Amateur Radio - The Last Line of Defense"

Craig Fugate, FEMA Administrator



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Massillon Holiday Parade
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator

  (Nov 1, 2015) - - The Massillon Amateur Radio Club's last scheduled public service event of the year is of course the annual Massillon Holiday Parade. This year’s parade is on Saturday, November 21st and we normally need about 20 volunteers to assist with parade staging, Cable TV, logistical support and general communications for the 80 plus units that generally make up this annual Massillon holiday tradition. The club has been a part of this parade for over 41 years making it one of the longest public service events handled by the club.

As in previous years we expect to have the club’s EComm Trailer as one of the parade units to remind area residents of our continued support of our community. Club member Perry Ballinger, W8AU is communications coordinator for the parade again this year and is looking for volunteers to joins us on parade day. A sign up sheet will be passed out at the November meeting. Please consider volunteering to help with this event. It’s a great way to get in the holiday spirit by welcoming Santa Claus to town. Don’t forget we normally get together after the parade at one of our local restaurant’s for a late breakfast or early lunch.

If you don’t make the club meeting contact Perry directly at (330) 832–8612 or by email to w8au@sssnet.com. We will gather downtown around 8:30 AM to decorate the trailer and begin assembling parade units. Communications will take place on 2 meters either simplex or the club’s 147.18 or our 442.85 UHF Repeater. Don’t forget your handheld set to the proper PL Tone and come on downtown to enjoy a great holiday parade !

Stark ARES Display
Terry Russ, N8ATZ - Emergency Coordinator

    (Nov 1, 2015) -- Stark ARES hosted an information table at the October 25th Massillon Hamfest. The table was staffed by ARES Net Manager Mike Lackney - KB8MIB and Assistant Net Manager Mike Palmer - KD8ENV.

Our display included a PowerPoint presentation covering basic ARES & Skywarn operations, a display of several versions of Emergency Response or (Go-Boxes) and informational literature. New this year was literature provided by the Stark County EMA Office.

Many visitors stopped by with questions and comments covering our ARES & Skywarn programs here in Stark County. My thanks to both Mike's for staffing the booth during the hamfest !

Mike Lackney, KB8MIB at the ARES Display

National Fire Protection Month
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator

   (Oct 9, 2015) - - In a disaster, local officials and relief workers cannot reach everyone immediately. Help may not arrive for hours or days. You and your family -- and don't forget to include the needs of those with disabilities -- need to be prepared ahead of time because you won't have time to shop or search for the supplies you will need when a disaster strikes.

Most disasters are natural disasters, the result of some force of nature, such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and floods. Some natural disasters can be predicted, such as hurricanes and severe winter storms, while others, such as tornadoes and earthquakes, happen with little or no warning.

Some disasters are the cause of human actions, intentional or unintentional. A disaster plan will help with safety, security, and comfort.

Regardless of the type of disaster, there are things you can do to prepare. Contact your local Red Cross chapter, visit the FEMA Web site, or Ready.gov to make sure you are aware of the potential for natural disasters in your community. After you have identified the types of disasters that could strike where you live, create a family disaster plan that can apply to any type of disaster – natural, unintentional, or intentional.

Prepare an emergency supplies kit
Disaster can occur suddenly and without warning. They can be frightening for adults, but they are traumatic for children if they don't know what to do when these events occur. Children depend on daily routines. When an emergency disturbs their routine, children can become nervous. In an emergency, they'll look to parents or other adults to help.

How parents react to an emergency gives children an indication on how to act. They see their parents' fear as proof that the danger is real. A parent's response during this time may have a long-term impact. Including children in the family's recovery plans will help them feel that their life will return to normal.

Families should prepare an emergency supplies kit (PDF, 257 KB) and develop a plan. Practice your plan so that everyone will remember what to do in an emergency. Everyone in the home, including children, should play a part in the family's response and recovery efforts. Remember: make the plan simple so everyone can remember the details.


 Ham radio operators practice fire prevention during our daily operating activities in their radio shacks and during our public service work in the community. Click on any of the logo's above to learn more.

Timken Steel Grand Parade
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator

  (Aug 16, 2015) ...  The Timken Steel Grand Parade starts long before the seats along Cleveland Avenue are filled. Long before the first float begins its journey, when the sky has yet to change from starlight black to morning blue. High School Bands are still finding their positions and tuning up their instruments, parade balloon are slowly being filled with helium while their handling teams get last minute marching instructions and the dozens of classic cars that carry football legends and celebrities alike are lined up like the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Among the thousands of parade volunteers, Amateur Radio operators  help to organize this vast ensemble of parade participants. These volunteers are members of the Stark County Amateur Radio Emergency Services and several other area radio clubs. For over 38 years, amateurs have provided communications services for this event that will total over 200 volunteer hours of service on this day alone. The parade has grown steadily in size over the years and now is the single largest public service event handled by amateur radio operators here in Stark County .

Again this year over 500,000 spectators watched the parade and behind the scenes lies a core of amateur volunteers many of which have over 20 years of experience assisting with the parade. This dedication is one reason that parade organizers have long realized the importance of effective communications that are necessary in organizing a parade of this magnitude. Also over the years, they have come to understand and appreciate the fact that it takes more than a radio to make an effective communicator. Parade General Chairman Joanna James, realized the limited range of their commercial radio's and she was grateful to learn that our communications was solid throughout the parade route thanks to our wide area coverage ARES Repeater on 147.12 Mhz.  The Canton ARC's club repeater on 146.79 Mhz was also ready to use as our backup if needed.

The last several years, parade officials have used loaned commercial radio's to maintain communications with their committee members.. While this has worked for routine short range communications, parade organizers have relied on the discipline and experience of amateur operators to handle urgent communications needs and especially medical traffic that occurs throughout the nearly two and a half mile parade route.

Continuing this year, in a reorganization of parade communications, our responsibilities covered four separate areas, each with it's own control point. These were Staging, Route Communications, Dispersal and Medical Support.

Staging is where it all begins. Event organizers and radio operators setup and arrange the over 130 units that make up this years parade. Beginning at about 2:00 A.M., this job is like taking a 5,000 piece puzzle and assembling all the pieces to create the final picture in a little over five hours. This doesn't include the setting up of the Television Broadcast area, Parade Communications Center and the Balloon Inflations area, all included in our early morning duties. At exactly 8:00 A.M., the gun sounds and the parade starts down the route. Terry Russ, N8ATZ is stationed at the  television area to act as communications liaison to Parade Chairman and Vice-Chairman Pete Trumper.

Route Communications then kicks in to help maintain the pace of the parade units. The pace of the parade is set by Canton Police Department motorcycle units. Each successive unit is to follow maintaining a certain spacing set by football helmets painted along the entire 2.5 mile parade route. Expected slowdowns occur during the parade in the TV area, where all units slow to perform for the crowd then speed back up to maintain proper spacing.  

Parade spacing and movement is a top priority for event coordinators, a role headed up again this year by Drew Felberg who was in charge of all parade marshals positioned throughout the parade route. Shadowed by a ham liaison Bill Maurer, KD8LCS, he monitors the condition of the entire route thanks to our network of radio operators. As spacing became an issue, Ron relayed instructions to all marshals to get everything back in sync. A task that would not be possible without the support of ham radio. This continued to be a daunting task and thanks to amateurs disciplined communications experience, we were effective in minimizing unit gaps throughout the parade. 

In addition, amateurs watched for trouble spots, assisted with broken down floats, crowd control, seating assistance, media relations, and medical support, these being only a few of the responsibilities handled by amateur radio operators. Net Control, under the direction of Ron Hendershot, KA8FTP, helps to ensure orderly parade radio traffic and maintains overall communications with all parade operations. Ron also monitored weather radar, another benefit provided by radio operators.  Twenty-nine radio operators were positioned along the entire parade route to handle this facet of parade operations.

Medical Support has continued to remain one of our most important parade responsibilities as thousands of participants and spectators crowd the route each year and brave a myriad of changeable weather to watch the grand parade. In recent years, county medical squads have updated their communications equipment to provide for better interoperability between the many emergency medical service units called in to assist with the parade. Due to these advances, amateurs' role in this area was decreased although operators along the route were prepared to assist should emergencies arise.  Again this year several emergencies did occur and radio operators again were called upon to support the EMS in providing communications assistance with this ever present problem area. 

As in previous years Emergency Coordinator Terry Russ - N8ATZ maintained communications with the Parade Chairman  in the Parade Communications Center assisted by former County EC Dave Beltz, WD8AYE. This provided a link to both Emergency Medical Service and Police personnel.  

Parade Dispersal continues to be an increasingly complex segment of the Grand Parade in recent years. This years responsibility for as  Dispersal Communications Coordinator remained  Kenn Rothman - WD8ILB . 

An important part of the parade, dispersal has had to handle numerous situations and problems including reuniting participants and parents and general disassembly of the entire parade. For the tenth year in a row, additional volunteers were assigned to this area.  With local amateurs running in short supply, volunteers were obtained from the Akron area including members from the Summit County Amateur Radio Emergency Service and several other area radio clubs including both the Canton and Alliance ARC and the Portage County ARC. A special thanks for these additional volunteers, provided through our Mutual Aid pact with neighboring county ARES.   

The 2015 Timken Grand Parade was another great success thanks to the many volunteers including the amateur radio operators who assisted us again this year. Parade General Chairman Joanna James and Communications Coordinators Wade Huthmacher – WD8MIU and Terry Russ - N8ATZ want to thank all the volunteers for their help and assistance during this years parade. Their tireless efforts, although largely unnoticed by the general public, have proven their worth time and time again over the years.

Parade Officials were very appreciative of the ham operators assistance in the parade each year, "I really don't think we could pull this thing off every year without ham radio assistance." County EC Terry Russ agreed: For over thirty years, ham radio operators have been the backbone of the parade, providing the bond that keeps it all running smoothly for the Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival Committee."  

Volunteers for this year’s parade include the following operators:

STAGING/COMMUNICATIONS Center:  Terry Russ - N8ATZ and Dave Beltz - WD8AYE. General Net Control - Ron Hendershot - KA8FTP.


PARADE COMMITTEE & TV SUPPORT: Team Leader Terry Russ - N8ATZ and Bill Maurer - KD8LCS.

ROUTE COMMUNICATIONS:   Mike McNamara - KB8OTK, Steve Simon - KD8SPF, Dave Selby - KC8WVH,  John Wagner - W8JJW, Dan Anastis - N8DZM, Tony Casebolt - KD8UXK, Bill Treacle - KD8TKX, Don Wade - W8DEA, Perry Warstler - N8VXQ, Fred Howe - WA8KOC.

North Route:  Perry Ballinger - W8AU, Wade Huthmacher - WD8MIU, Dotty Moriarty - KD8DQU, Pat Quinlon - KA8DAL, Jeff Gortney - K8JAG, Ted Forex - N8EIG,  Ted Faix - KB8PRK, Jim Mulvanne - KC8REA, Deb Conklin - KD8DEB, James France - WA8HHO, Dale Storey - KB8LWP, Rick Fligor - KD8NYZ, Scott McGill - KC8ZCT, Igor Nikishin - K8INN, Gary Limbert - KD8VIQ  and Tom Gill - KC8QOD.

DISPERSAL Team Leader:  Kenn Rothman - WD8ILB,   Tom Gill - KC8QOD, Denise Gill,  Leonard Johnson - N8XPI, Tim France - WB8HHP,  and Frank Koby - N8SGS.   

Congratulations to everyone on another great Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival !

HOF Community Parade
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator

 (Aug 2, 2015) - -     With a slight chance of severe weather, members of the Stark Co ARES, Canton & Massillon ARC's once again assisted in the opening events of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival by providing communications support for the Community Parade held this year on Sunday, July 26th.

Again this year amateurs provided both logistical support communications for parade staging as well as medical support covering the EMS units assigned to the parade route and TV Production assistance.

Digital packet communications were utilized to synchronize the nearly 106 parade units making up this years parade. Using a voice relay from Bill Maurer, KD8LCS who relayed the exact line up to Tom, KC8QOD and Charlie Scherger, KB8STV who then sent this down to Jason, KC8LIN inside the Television Production truck. This system allowed parade officials to make any last minute lineup changes and accurately convey this to the TV producer. 

Packet is used for this function and has proven to be the perfect choice as it allows van personnel to continuously monitor the status of all units in the parade. This marks the 16th year this has been used and is an important aspect of our parade assistance.

This year severe weather was forecast to arrive in Stark County by early afternoon which caused concern with the parade officials. Once again, amateur radio came through as we established our Severe Weather net on the 147.12 Repeater with Dave Beltz, WD8AYE keeping a close eye on the weather radar for us as the storm front moved into our area. Cleveland NWS established a Severe Thunderstorm Warning just before 2 PM and all eyes maintained constant communications with both the NWS and parade officials to determine if the start of the parade would have to be delayed. Thankfully, the worst of the weather held off and the parade started on time. Chris Gumpp, Assistant Director of the Canton Chamber of Commerce was thankful we were able to provide timely and accurate weather information. Safety for both the participants and spectators is always a top priority during all Festival events and amateur radio operators can always be counted upon to provide this safety service. Hard rains did fall later on and the parade was cancelled with only a few units forced to move off the parade route. 

Our other parade responsibility and perhaps our most important, is our  role in medical support. Amateurs were stationed with Canton EMS units and provided a common communications link to the medical command center in demarshaling area. Fortunately due to cooler weather this year, there were no medical issues. Mike Palmer, KD8ENV acted as Medical Liaison in the staging area.  Captain Ray Friedman of the Canton Fire Department appreciated our efforts in support of the medical units.

Community Parade General Chairman Carol McLaughlin expressed her heartfelt thanks to all the radio operators for their assistance. "Your operators are a vital part of this parade", said Carol, "your continued support year after year makes all the difference". 

A special thank you to the following volunteers who assisted with this years event. The staging and logistical support crew included Bill Maurer - KD8LCS. TV production support included  Tom Gill – KC8QOD, Charlie Scherger - KB8STV and Jason Stroll - KC8LIN in the TV Production Van.  Net Control was handled by Terry Russ - N8ATZ. Medical Unit support included  Mike Palmer – KD8ENV in staging with  Tony Casebolt - KD8UXK in demarshaling.  Igor Nikishin - K8INN and Dottie Moriarity - KD8DQU provided reports along the Market Avenue Route. Dave Beltz, WD8AYE provided weather updates to parade officials. 

A terrific job from a great crew, thanks again for your support of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival !

Severe Weather Report
Terry Russ, N8ATZ - Stark Co EC

 (Jun 19, 2015) - - Situation update to the severe weather pattern that came through Stark County last Thursday.

Our initial evaluation of the area shows most of the damage occurred in the Uniontown and Hartville areas.  According to the NWS the winds in our area reached 80 mph.  The wind damage path is several miles wide with a smaller intense path approximately 300 ft wide.  This path was located in the area of the Uniontown Fire Department to the intersection of Smith-Kramer, Middle Branch and Market Avenue following a path to State Route 44 in Marlboro Township. 

The NWS will be out later today to evaluate the pattern of damage to the area.  There is a possibility that this smaller intense path of damage is consistent with tornado activity.  The NWS suggests at this time without further evaluation that it is possible to have had a small tornado embedded within the larger storm. 

All the resource needs in the damaged areas were met locally with the Red Cross providing canteen services to local responders until 3:30 am.  One person was provided shelter by the Red Cross due to specific medical needs. 

The NWS has determined that Stark County had an EF-1 tornado estimated to be 100 yards wide at 105 mph.  The tornado touched down in Uniontown and traveled East-SE along an intermittent path for approximately 9 miles.  Most of the damage was to trees being uprooted or snapped half way up.  A newly constructed dairy barn in Marlboro Township in the area of Rt 44 and Peters Church road had significant roof damage.  Minor roof and siding damage to homes was observed along the path. 

Throughout the event Stark County Skywarn was activated and maintained close communication with the Stark County EMA office in case our assistance was requested.

ARES Activation
Terry Russ, N8ATZ - Stark Co EC

 (Jan 19, 2015) - - Stark County ARES was activated the evening of January 13th when a telephone outage caused by an equipment failure in a Summit County AT&T switching station caused multiple equipment failures throughout the area. Here in Stark County local emergency service phone line failure resulted in an emergency declaration and the Stark County EMA office was activated.

EMA Director Tim Warstler requested ARES activation to provide communications and logistics support to his office. ARES member David Beltz was first to respond to the office at 9:00 PM only to find that our equipment had been temporarily removed as building renovation was in process.  Dave contacted EC Terry Russ to respond as well. Our portable equipment kit was brought to the EOC to establish communications. Antennas had also been removed and thanks to support from local radio station WHBC and their remote truck, station engineer Dale Lamm, NX8J, we were able to setup a temporary antenna. This completed we established a net on our ARES Repeater.

During net operations, we made contact with the multiple EMA offices affected by the phone outage. We were also in contact with the Ohio EMA office in Columbus. During the next four hours we helped maintain communications links with multiple offices and public safety forces as well as staff the MARCS Statewide Radio System. The Massillon ARC offered the use of their Communications Trailer in case support equipment was needed.

Stark County Sheriff George Maier and EMA Director Tim Warstler were thankful for area amateurs quick response to this short communications emergency. Full phone service was restored and by approximately 1:30 AM we closed down the emergency net and operations from the EOC. 

Click Here to read the ARRL recap of the comm emergency.

County EC Terry, N8ATZ operates using our Go-Box from the radio room.
(Photo courtesy of Dale Lamm, NX8J)

"Go-Box" Version 2.0
Terry Russ, N8ATZ - Stark Co EC

 (Dec 27, 2014) - - While I was very satisfied with my latest Equipment or Go-Box based on the Gator 8U Rack Mount Case, it did have several limitations. On my latest design, I tried to correct these limitations and come up with a more useful Field Box.  The full report including several pictures is posted on the Projects Page.  Have a look at it and let me know what you think.

ARES Readiness Update
Terry Russ, N8ATZ - Stark Co EC

  (Oct 18, 2014) - - Massillon City officials have initiated an incident command system (ICS) as a precautionary measure in the event of a local emergency relating to Ebola. ICS is a military-style command structure used to coordinate response to emergencies and has been part of the Stark County ARES training for many years.

Massillon City Health Commissioner Terri Argent noted that the agency is ramping up and maintaining communications daily with city safety forces in order to be able to respond quickly if an emergency occurs.

City Safety-Service Director Al Hennon, Fire Chief Tom Burgasser and Argent meet daily to discuss the status of this issue and how it might relate to the city. The Canton City Health Department has also implemented a similar response system in the event of an emergency.

Stark County ARES maintains communications with our County EMA office and would be ready if called upon to provide support communications to area hospitals, health departments and the EOC if needed.


The Equipment Box Primer
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator


 (Feb 2, 2014) - - An equipment or "Go-Box" is quickly becoming an essential part of every radio amateur involved in public service communications. More and more, amateurs are being tasked to quick deploy to everything from local public service drills to disaster scenes.


Equipment Boxes have been showcased at several Ohio Section ARES meetings and I have posted several of my designs on this website the past year. I have received a few emails asking for more information on the topic and have added some additional information on the Projects Page of this website. Additional pictures of several of my own designs are included as well as a link to many shown during the past Ohio Section ARES meetings.


If any of you have built your own versions we would be happy to include them on the page. Send me a short recap of your design with pictures if you have them and I will post them.


A portable Go-Box can be a great project and very useful when you need additional capability during an ARES event.


Click Here for a direct link to our Project Page.


Don Wade, W8DEA receives Public Service Award
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator

  (Jan 20, 2014) - - The Massillon Amateur Radio Club recognized club member Don Wade, W8DEA with their annual Public Service Award for 2013 during their annual Awards Banquet on Saturday, January 11th. Don is also part of Stark Co ARES as an Assistant EC in charge of our training program.

A past recipient of this award, Don again demonstrated his commitment to our community and the Amateur Radio Service during 2013 on assignment throughout the country with FEMA working in the aftermath of several major disasters providing support to victims at relief centers. Once this mission was finished, often requiring several months or more away from home, Don returned to Stark County to resume serving his club and the ARES.

Congratulations to Don for this well deserved recognition !

MARC President Mike Sciarini, WA8MKH presents Don (R)  with his Public Service Award.

ARRL ARES E-Letter Posted
Terry Russ, N8ATZ -  Emergency Coordinator

   (Oct 20, 2015) --  The  September 16, 2015 edition of The ARES E-Letter is currently posted and includes the following highlights; Second Annual Joint Tribal Emergency Management Conference Held in Pacific Northwest SimCom 2015: Wisconsin Hosts Major Interoperability Exercise ARES Supports Pikes Peak Ascent and Marathon Why Public Service-Oriented Hams Should Participate in Contests First AuxComm Course Held in Arizona Make an Emergency Communication Plan  You can read the entire newsletter on the ARRL website. Click Here for a direct link.

 - National ARES News  - 

Hams Support Air Force Marathon
Courtesy of the ARRL

Logistics Net Control Ron Cramer, KD8ENJ (left), and Medical Net 1 Control Shawna Collins, N2TUJ, in the DARA control center van. [George Touchette photo]  (Nov 8, 2015) - -  When the 15,000 plus runners sprang from the starting line at the recent 2015 Air Force Marathon and related races, 65 ham radio operators were on duty to make sure the September 19 competition was as safe as possible. Held each year at Wright Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, the Marathon uses base roadways as well as streets in Fairborn and Riverside. Hams are positioned at critical points throughout the courses, not only to provide communication, but to serve as additional eyes and ears, watching for any signs of problems. Hams have been a part of the race since the first official marathon was held in 1997.

“This race would be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to accomplish without their support and dedication,” USAF Marathon Director Robert Aguiar said of the Amateur Radio volunteers. He said hearing the ham radio net on the morning of the race makes his stress level goes down.

Assigned by Amateur Radio lead volunteer Dave Crawford, KF4KWW, ham volunteers provided emergency logistic and medical communications between the race director, his staff, Wright-Patterson AFB incident command, and hydration and medical stations along the course.  Read More....

Amateur Radio Part of Typhoon Koppu Response in the Philippines
Courtesy of the ARRL

HERO-logo1-300x138.jpg (Oct 19, 2015) - -  Amateur Radio in the Philippines was part of the comprehensive response to the Category 4 Typhoon Koppu — known locally as Typhon Lando — which hit the islands over the weekend with damaging winds and heavy rain. According to the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), the National Telecommunications Commission (NTC) coordinated with the Philippine Amateur Radio Association (PARA) to monitor conditions in affected regions through their local Amateur Radio associations.

PARA stood by to monitor reports from Amateur Radio groups, and through the PARA DU Net, went into emergency mode to monitor reports from the eastern seaboard of the main island, Luzon, through its Ham Emergency Radio Operator Network (HERO). Lando may have been the second most powerful storm to strike the country this year.

The typhoon came ashore on northeastern Aurora province on October 19, leaving at least a dozen dead, forcing tens of thousands from their homes, and knocking out power and telecommunications. The storm had weakened to a tropical storm by this afternoon, Philippines time. At least three people are dead, several villages are flooded, and the slow moving typhoon was expected to linger for days.

The overall response also involved the fire service, Coast Guard, police, army, the Red Cross, and other trained volunteers, harnessing an enormous planned response effort.

   Monitor the 147.12 Mhz Repeater for Severe Weather information here in Stark County !


Our thanks to Mercy Medical Center for their commitment to the Stark County Amateur Radio Emergency Service and First Communications for their support of Stark County Winlink.

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The Stark County Amateur Radio Emergency Service
Canton,  Ohio  44701

ARES®, Amateur Radio Emergency Service and the ARES logo are registered trademarks of the American Radio Relay League, Incorporated and are used by permission.



Our PurposeSkip Commissioner Navigation Links

Welcome to the new Stark County ARES Website. The Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) consists of licensed Amateur Radio operators who have voluntarily registered their qualifications and equipment for communications duty in the public interest when disaster strikes.


Our MissionSkip Commissioner Navigation Links

The Stark County ARES has always been dedicated to the completion of three goals. One, to provide the citizens of Stark County and local Public Service officials with a team of highly skilled and dedicated radio operators ready to assist when needed. Two, to provide Stark County amateurs with a full featured, reliable wide area coverage ARES Repeater. And three, to provide an information service for both amateurs and the community.

With the redesign of this website, we hope we have accomplished this mission. We welcome your comments.


ARES News Skip Commissioner Navigation Links

November News

A new ARES On-Line Registration form is being tested on the website. Using this form you can complete a new or update your existing ARES Volunteer Registration Status.


2016 Stark Co ARES meeting schedule will be posted when dates are set.

Meetings will be on Thursday Evenings at the Stark County EOC Office beginning at 7:00 PM. 

Stark Co ARES Repeater is on 147.12+, PL 110.9

County Winlink RMS Packet Relay is on 145.07 Simplex. Callsigns are N8ATZ-10 (Eastern Stark Node) and WA8GXM-10 (Western Stark Node).


Ohio Section ARES News is available on the Ohio ARES Website. Click Here to read the latest Section News. 


Click Here to see some simple ARES portable antenna mounts you can use during local public service drills and events.

Review Current Activities in the Stark County Winlink Initiative.


Powerpoleing Your Power Connections

  The ARRL recently reviewed a new website that does a great job of describing the Anderson Powerpole connectors. The site describes the connectors in detail and provides tips on assembling and using them on your equipment.

For higher power rigs and DC power supplies, the Anderson Powerpole is the emerging National ARES/RACES standard.

The site also contains links for additional Amateur Radio Emergency Communications ideas, a portable EC station and a Quick Response Team Go Kit. This site has lots of useful ARES information, well beyond the powerpole ideas.

Click Here to visit the site.


New Emergency Communications Handbook

The ARRL announces a new emergency communications handbook for all hams that volunteer their skills in public service applications. The handbook includes details on basic emergency communications skills, message handling, and much more. This reference will help you to understand the public service role amateurs will play and what to take along.

The Handbook is 176 pages and costs $ 19.95 plus shipping from the ARRL and other dealers.

(Mar 26, 2006) -- The ARRL has introduced a new Emergency Communications Catalog containing a host of items using the "When All Else Fails" theme. The items are a great reminder that Amateur Radio provides immediate, high-quality communications that work every time, when all else fails.

The items include T-Shirts, Pins, Stickers, Patches, Magnetic Signs, Banners, a Coffee Mug and Key Chain all carrying the "When All Else Fails" theme. Click Here to visit the catalog.


Click Here to download a current ARES Registration Form. Help us keep your record current !

Anderson Power Pole Connectors, the defacto standard for ARES power connections. 


Other News

Amateur's Support COOL Project...

2010 Tour de Cure Report...

2010 HOF Festival Timken Grand Parade....

2010 HOF Festival Community Parade Report..

Alliance ARC Take Part in Drill.

Stark ARES Attends District Meeting.

ARES Repeater Anniversity...

Stark ARES & MARC Assist With 2009 Annual MS Walk.

MARC Assists With Massillon Holiday Parade.

Hurricane Ike's Winds Hit Stark County.

Stark ARES Assists With Akron Marathon.

March 2008 Winlink Updates

ARES Teams Activated for Northwest Near Record Flooding.

MARC Assists With Annual MS Walk.

ARRL Board Accepts NERPC Report.

Airmail Station Completed at Mercy Medical Center.

Stark County ARES Part of OEHA Fall Conference.         

Click above for official ARES Logo merchandise from the ARRL.



The Official Stark County ARES Name Badge Supplier. Click on the logo for details.


The Stark County ARES is a proud supporter of the Annual Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Festival providing communications support for over 25 years !



Stark County EMA is now on Facebook. They will use the new social media site to provide ongoing public information about disaster related issues in the county.

Please Like and share with your friends !

Look for them by going to "starkcountyema" on facebook.  


last reviewed/updated on 11/08/15